Saturday, February 25, 2017

Documentary Genre Gaining Popularity


Artists and Orphans: A True Drama is a story about humanitarian work undertaken by a group of American actors and dancers in the Republic of Georgia. Profiling an effort to aid an orphanage in need of repairs and supplies in the face of the oncoming winter, Artists and Orphans: A True Drama that earned an Academy Award nomination in 2002 for Best Documentary Short Subject.

In order to qualify as a documentary, a film must be a nonfiction piece that uses motion picture to capture some aspect of reality. Documentary films often take an unusual or unknown approach to a topic and craft a narrative that generates a desire in the audience to continue watching through to the end, even when the subject matter is emotionally difficult.

In recent years, the documentary film genre has experienced a significant boost in popularity. For example, the British Film Institute indicated that only four documentaries were released in British theaters in 2001, whereas just over a decade later 86 found their way into theaters. This can be attributed, in part, to a higher number of streaming platforms offering documentaries for rent or purchase.

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

The Beginning of the Academy Awards


Artists and Orphans: A True Drama is a short documentary about a group of New York artists attending an arts festival in the Republic of Georgia. Artists and Orphans: A True Drama tells the story of the artists’ efforts to help the children of a dilapidated orphanage in the face of seemingly endless obstacles. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short Subject in 2002, at the 74th Academy Awards ceremony.

The International Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was formed by the studio chief Louis B. Mayer as a group to support the film industry. The organization was created in 1927 and actor Douglas Fairbanks was installed as president.

In 1930, the first Academy Awards ceremony was a banquet with 270 Hollywood luminaries in attendance. The next year, the Academy Awards were produced with a live broadcast on the radio. The list of winners was given to newspapers across the country to be published after 11 p.m. In 1940, the Los Angeles Times published the list early, allowing those in Los Angeles to discover the winners before the ceremony took place. This led to the live announcement of the winners at the ceremony, with the voting results for each award kept securely in a sealed envelope.